Copywriting and Brand Insights

An insight is a hold on the core truth about what a brand represents. It differentiates the brand from its competitors simply by acknowledging and utilizing the core truth about that particular brand. Take, for example, the automotive industry. At its essence, a car is a car, is a car, is a car, is a car, is a car. Design aside, the first automobile invented essentially performed the same generic role as the modern-day car today – mobilizing people from one point to another.

Manufacturers that are talking about generic qualities are doing just that – talking. Those that are gaining insights into what makes having a car beneficial, and then branding that premise, are already in the lead. Car manufacturers who have gained an insight into what attributes differentiate their cars have the strongest brands in this highly competitive and relatively expensive market.

Think about the attribute of ‘safety’ and which manufacturer comes to mind? What about the attributes of ‘performance’, ‘progressive technology’, ‘perfection’, ‘all-terrain’, ‘luxury’, ‘reliability’, ‘fuel economy’, ‘cute’, ‘zippy’, ‘irreverent’, ‘stately’?

Whichever manufacturer you matched to each attribute, it is the result of those manufacturers gaining and exploiting an insight – a core truth about their cars – that they have successfully differentiated and branded. Companies are realizing the awesome power of insight – the fundamental truth about their products and services – and are positioning their brand strategy around this insight. This is good for a number of reasons.

Insight creates a perpetual notion of what your product or service stands for. Brands grow, change, expand, and some die, but what the product or service stands for – what it offers simply by being – remains constant as long as the product or service is created the same way. This permanence lays the foundation for future growth and brand development.

Insight often leads to a deluge of ideas on how to connect with people. Remember an insight is a core understanding of the truth about a product or service. Once an organization has this insight, the ideas it generates create connections with its people (consumers and stakeholders) so they too get a grasp on this core truth. Lots of ideas are created for lots of people, but the insight always remains the same.

Insight can help a brand to accurately map its product, price, place, promotion, and people in the market place. If an insight reveals the brand is popular within the high net worth demographic, the corresponding brand strategy can be leveraged accordingly for maximum gain. Similarly if an insight reveals an attribute that is popular within the teenage and tween demographic, the brand can focus its energy on building maximum equity without wasting resources on less promising markets.

Insight can lead to brand reinforcement. Organizations that gain one insight can launch a strong brand strategy to bolster awareness and benefits. A brand strategy, by virtue of its nature, is cyclical and comes back to the source full of experiences, ready to begin another insight for greater brand growth. The brand begins to ascend the benefits ladder to achieve new, undefined qualities of awareness and dissemination. This process is called laddering, where brands move from being utility-centric to lifestyle-centric, and finally to self-worth-centric.

Finally, insight can help an organization to mobilize its internal people – the brand ambassadors. Nothing motivates people more, to become brand ambassadors, than a firm understanding of what benefits the product or service they are selling can provide for themselves and their customers. Once a truth about a product or service is acquired, the motivation to connect others with that truth takes on a life of its own. The brand becomes its own living, breathing, growing entity.